Posts

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Indian Summer in the Shasta Cascade

Feather River Scenic Byway (10/21/17) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Feather River Scenic Byway (10/21/17) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Feather River Scenic Byway (10/21/17) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Indian Summer is the “spell of warm weather after the first frost.”

This American expression was first recorded in 1778 in a letter written to England, though its origins are uncertain.

Some attribute it to having come from areas inhabited by Native-Americans or because Indians were the first to describe it.

Beaver pond, Frenchman’s Lake (10/21/17) Parrish Todd

Packer Lake, Plumas County (10/22/17) Parrish Todd

Regardless of how it got coined, it is a pleasant period of warm weather following an early frost. That is happening now in the Shasta Cascade, where last week snow fell (see below). This week, temperatures are in the 70s and Peak color – appropriately – is being seen in the Indian Valley of Plumas County (northern Sierra).

Local color spotter Jeff Luke Titcomb writes that color is at peak, though that it will – like an Indian summer – soon be gone. Black oak dominate with deep orange leaves contrasting with their black limbs.

Yellow, chartreuse and red pop out at points along CA-89 and CA-70 on the route north, leaving the Sierra and entering the lower cascades at Lassen Volcanic National Park.

Indian Valley, CA-89 – Peak (75-100%) GO NOW!

Manzanita Lake, Lassen Volcanic National Park (10/20/17) Larry Robbins

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It Hasta Be Shasta: Meadow Valley

Sugar Maple, Acer saccharum, Meadow Valley (10/19/17) Michael Beatley

Years ago, “It Hasta Be Shasta” was the motto of one of my PR clients, the Shasta Beverage Company. That motto sure fits what’s happening up north, as fall color is now filling the Shasta Cascade with beauty.

For the coming week, it hasta be Shasta.

Penny farthing in a field, North Arm of Indian Valley (10/17/17) Michael Beatley

Color spotter Michael Beatley was riding past Meadow Valley (not on the penny farthing seen at left) when he spied a Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum).

Sugar maples are exotic trees (native to eastern Canada and the northeast U.S.), known for their brilliant fall color.

Meadow Valley is eight miles west of Quincy on the old Beckwourth Trail where Black Bart robbed stage coaches in the late 1870s. The town was settled around 1850.

Bigleaf maple, Indian rhubarb, Indian Creek,
Taylorsville (10/17/17) Michael Beatley

It sits at the base of Spanish Peak in the Plumas National Forest, which is full of native aspen, maple, dogwood, cottonwood, pine and fir.

Michael reports that “CA-89 from CA-70 towards Taylorsville, Greenville and Chester is very beautiful, with a lot of color along Indian Creek.”

Meadow Valley – Near Peak (50-75%) GO NOW!

Indian Creek, Taylorsville (10/17/17) Michael Beatley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spanish Peak, Meadow Valley (10/17/17) Michael Beatley

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Storm Arriving

Truckee River (10/19/17) Herb Huang

Foray Rd., Greenville, Plumas County (10/18/17) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Locations like these, shot by Herb Huang and Jeff Luke Titcomb, will be overcast for the next 24-hours as a storm passes over Northern California.

The storm will blow turned leaves from most trees, but it won’t denude them.

Lots of color will remain, particularly on trees that were nearing peak, as they still have the strength in the leaves to, as Avril Lavigne would sing…

Keep holding on
‘Cause you know we’ll make it through
We’ll make it through
Just stay strong
‘Cause you know I’m here for you
I’m here for you
There’s nothing you could say
Nothing you could do
There’s no other way when it comes to the truth
So keep holding on
‘Cause you know we’ll make it through
We’ll make it through

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Peak of the Week: Indian Creek

Black Oak, Indian Valley, Plumas County (10/26/16) Jeff Titcomb

Black Oak, Indian Valley, Plumas County (10/26/16) Jeff Titcomb

Indian Rhubarb, Indian Creek (10/26/16) Jeff Titcomb

Indian Rhubarb, Indian Creek (10/26/16) Jeff Titcomb

Indian Creek, Plumas County (10/26/16) Jeff Titcomb

Indian Creek, Plumas County (10/26/16) Jeff Titcomb

Indian Rhubarb, Indian Creek (10/26/16) Jeff Titcomb

Indian Rhubarb, Indian Creek (10/26/16) Jeff Titcomb

Indian Creek in Plumas County (Northern Sierra) is painted with color with Indian rhubarb at full brilliance, dogwood and bigleaf maple showing pink and yellow and black oak beginning to turn bright orange.

Indian Creek, Plumas County – Peak (75-100%) GO NOW!

Indian Valley Peaking – Go Now!

Indian Valley (11/6/12) Jeff Luke Titcomb

75 – 100% – Indian Valley – Color spotter Jeff Luke Titcomb reports the Indian Valley, southeast of Lake Almanor is “at peak color right now.”

This scenic mountain meadow was so named in 1851 for the large number of native Maidu people living there.  Greenville is the largest town in the valley.  Other communities include Taylorsville, Crescent Mills and Canyon Dam.

The valley is considered to be one of the best places in Plumas County for a scenic drive, due to its being surrounded by mountains, its tree-lined meadow and ranches, old barns and grazing cattle.