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Sunsets Over The Central Valley

Central Valley Sunset, Folsom Lake (11/7/16) John Poimiroo

Blue oak, Folsom Lake sunset (11/7/16) John Poimiroo

Autumn sunsets are the best of the year, particularly as seen across the Central Valley.

Sunsets are particularly spectacular in autumn because blue light is scattered easiest by nitrogen and oxygen air molecules, whereas “longer wavelengths — reds and oranges – are not scattered as much by air molecules,” The Weather Channel reports.

During sunrise and sunset, sunlight must pass through more of the atmosphere before we see it. TWC explains, “so it comes into contact with even more molecules in the air.”  And, “As days grow shorter, the skies at sunset glow with the most spectacular hues, blooming with pinks, reds and oranges.”

Autumn weather patterns also bring drier, cleaner air from the north, allowing more colors of the spectrum to “make it through to our eyes without getting scattered by particles in the air, producing brilliant sunsets and sunrises that can look red, orange, yellow or even pink,” concludes TWC.

In the Central Valley, agricultural haze from farmers burning off their fields adds carbon molecules to the air, making the sunsets downright awe inspiring.

[wunderground location=”El Dorado Hills, CA” numdays=”4″ showdata=”daynames,icon,date,conditions,highlow” layout=”simple”]

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A Satisfying Drive Through Sacramento

Leaf Cookies, Freeport Bakery, Sacramento (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Leaf Cookies, Freeport Bakery, Sacramento (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

The most satisfying leaves of autumn are Leaf Cookies sold at the Freeport Bakery in Sacramento.

Buying a half-dozen of them has become a sure stop on a routine fall color drive that I take each November along the American River to Sacramento and back.

Mormon Island (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Mormon Island (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Mormon Island (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Mormon Island (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The drive begins in Folsom where Mormon Island Wetlands and the boulevards of Folsom are near peak. Frémont cottonwood at the wetlands preserve (part of Folsom Lake State Recreation Area) began showing yellow in September, though they still have lots of green, lime and fresh yellow in them.

Rooster, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Guarding Rooster, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Rooster, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Posing Rooster, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Plaza Park, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Plaza Park, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Continuing west on US 50, I exit at Sunrise Blvd. for a visit to downtown Fair Oaks where, near Plaza Park, roosters hold court, crowing, scratching and otherwise guarding their turf.

The roosters are part of the charm of Fair Oaks, a rural town that is now surrounded by suburbia and has become an oasis of authentic shops, cafes and restaurants.

Rooster, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Strutting Rooster, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Rooster, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Curious Rooster, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Rooster, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

Seeing Red Rooster, Fair Oaks (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Returning to US 50 and traveling on to Sacramento, I exit and tour “the 40s,” Sacramento’s tony residential area, so named because it is comprised of avenues numbered in the 40s.

16th Avenue, Sacramento (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

16th Avenue, Sacramento (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

41st Avenue, Sacramento (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

41st Avenue, Sacramento (11/5/16) John Poimiroo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Along the avenues, leaves that have fallen from the capital city’s towering London planetrees are blown into piles to be scooped up by city street cleaners and taken away.

London planetrees are a variety of sycamore.  Their leaves are a mix of chartreuse and orange-brown. Presently, they’re near peak.

Sacramento prides itself as a city of trees and nowhere is that more evident than at William Land Park, south of downtown or on the drive into Sacramento International Airport, where trees are planted by species in a grand arboretum that leads to the airport’s terminals.

No wonder, Leaf Cookies are so popular in Sacramento.

American River and Sacramento – Near Peak (75-100%) GO NOW! – 

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Urban Forest Exotics

Pacific dogwood (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Pacific dogwood (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Eastern redbud (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Eastern redbud (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Eastern redbud (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Eastern redbud (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As color descends throughout California, the bold stands of aspen have disappeared. The last remaining big show are the black oak, which continue to show orange color at elevations below 3,000′.

Oregon splitleaf birch (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Oregon splitleaf birch (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Pacific dogwood (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Pacific dogwood (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Color spotters turn to California’s urban forests for bright color, as I did this past week in my garden in El Dorado Hills (800′).

Chinese pistache (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Chinese pistache (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Chinese pistache (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

Chinese pistache (11/2/16) John Poimiroo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There, Eastern redbud, Pacific dogwood, breeze-brushed Oregon splitleaf birch and Chinese pistache were backlit and beautiful.

Today, I head out on a search for more exotics showing color in Sacramento’s urban forest.

California’s Urban Forests – Peak (75-100%) GO NOW!

[wunderground location=”El Dorado Hills, CA” numdays=”4″ showdata=”daynames,icon,date,conditions,highlow” layout=”simple”]

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Camanche Colorizes Calaveras County

Lake Camanche (10/17/16) Terry Willard

Lake Camanche (10/17/16) Terry Willard

Lake Camanche (10/17/16) Terry Willard

Lake Camanche (10/17/16) Terry Willard

Lake Camanche (10/17/16) Terry Willard

Lake Camanche (10/17/16) Terry Willard

… and Amador and San Joaquin counties, too, because Lake Camanche sits astride all three counties.

South of Ione and east of Lodi, Lake Camanche – managed by East Bay Municipal Utilities District – is famous for fishing (record largemouth bass inhabit its waters), camping, boating, horseback riding and picnicking. Though in autumn, it earns kudos for its native and exotic trees that cast their reflections in its still waters.

Lake Camanche color spotter Terry Willard sent these photos of color emerging there, today.  Surrounding Lake Camanche is California’s vast Central Valley. It is one of last large areas in the state to peak.

To Lake Camanche’s south is Stockton (University of the Pacific) and Modesto (American Graffiti); to its east is Lodi and its many vineyards and tasting rooms; to its west is the Gold Country with autumn color filling more vineyards and historic 1850s towns; and to its north are Sacramento with its urban forest of towering chartreuse-colored London Plane trees (sycamore) and miles upon miles of walnut orchards along CA-99.

The color at Lake Camanche should peak in two to three weeks, in time with peaks in these other locations, making Lake Camanche a central and inexpensive place to base when exploring autumn scenes throughout the region.

Lake Camanche – Patchy (10-50%)

 

 

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Gallimauphry: Weekend Update

Hope Valley (10/8/16) Andrew Zheng

Hope Valley (10/8/16) Andrew Zheng

This is one of the longest reports California Fall Color has ever published. It is so, because of many detailed reports received.

Unbeknownst to us, our inbox crashed along with the server, causing reports sent to us last week to arrive today. So, please bear with this long post, as it’s full of great photos and important guidance for the week ahead.

NORTHERN SIERRA

The upper areas of the Hope Valley are past peak, though as seen in Andrew Zheng’s photo (above) of the cabin near the junction of CA-88 and CA-89, a mix of developing lime to fully peaked trees can be seen side-by-side with stripped trees.

Hope Valley – Peak to Past Peak YOU ALMOST MISSED IT!

EASTERN SIERRA

Glacier Lodge (10/5/16) Clayton Peoples

Glacier Lodge (10/5/16) Clayton Peoples

First Report: Longtime contributor, Clayton Peoples sent news of “an oft-overlooked gem,” Glacier Lodge which is west of Big Pine in the southern Eastern Sierra, off US 395. He visited the previous weekend and found some nice patchy color in the lower elevations and near peak higher up, with more color appearing this week.  He promises to return.

Tip of the Day: a number of canyons lead up into the Eastern Sierra from US 395. These are often lightly visited and full of color.  No, they don’t have the big stands of aspen found in Bishop Creek or at June Lake, but they’re beautiful, nonetheless. And, for So. Calif. color spotters they’re a lot closer to reach.

Glacier Lodge, Big Pine – Near Peak (50-75%) GO NOW!

Surveyor's Meadow (10/6/16) Robert Provin

Surveyor’s Meadow (10/6/16) Robert Provin

Sabrina Approach (10/9/16) Abhi Bhaskaran

Sabrina Approach (10/9/16) Abhi Bhaskaran

Sabrina Approach (10/9/16) Julie Kirby

Sabrina Approach (10/9/16) Julie Kirby

Sabrina Approach (10/6/16) Robert Provin

Sabrina Approach (10/6/16) Robert Provin

Mist Falls, Bishop Creek Canyon (10/6/16) Michael Caffey

Mist Falls, Bishop Creek Canyon (10/6/16) Michael Caffey

Mist Falls, Bishop Creek Canyon (10/6/16) Michael Caffey

Convict Lake, Mono County (10/6/16) Michael Caffey

Bishop Creek is past peak at its upper reaches, though peak color can still be found (conditions permitting) at mid and lower elevations.

Then, there are exceptions like the Sabrina Approach, photographed by Abhi Bhaskaran, Robert Provin and Julie Kirby.

 

Following is a video from Bishop showing what the canyon looked like this past weekend.

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Bishop Creek Canyon – Upper Elevations – Past Peak YOU MISSED IT!

Bishop Creek Canyon – Mid Elevations – Near Peak and Peak  GO NOW!

Bishop Creek Canyon – Low Elevations – Patchy (10-50%)

Pine Creek Road (10/8/16) Gigi deJong

Pine Creek Road (10/8/16) Gigi deJong

Pine Creek (10/8/16) Gigi deJong

Pine Creek (10/8/16) Gigi deJong

Millpond County Park, Inyo County (10/8/16) Gigi deJong

Millpond County Park, Inyo County (10/8/16) Gigi deJong

Gigi deJong toured Round Valley, northwest of Bishop in the Eastern Sierra on Friday and found the cottonwood just turning yellow.

Though, there are “some lovely stand in picturesque spots,” with rabbitbrush in full irridescent yellow bloom, complementing the trees perfectly.

Counterpoints include bull rushes along the creeks, an occasional apple tree and “old structures that have lovely patina.”

Farm animals and the Sierra Nevada provide ornamentation that complements the scene and makes it classically a California Fall Color diorama.

She recommends exploring Pine Creek Rd., Round Valley Rd., Horton Creek Campground and Millpond County Park (Inyo County).

Round Valley, Inyo County (northwest of Bishop) – Patchy (10-50%), though well worth a trip.

Color spotter Anthony DeChiaro hiked to the Hilton Lakes on Oct. 6 to find the area denuded of leaves. He admitted he didn’t spend a lot of time searching for color around the lake, but that’s about what we would have expected, considering that the lakes are from 9,800′ to 11,000′ in elevation, and everything abover 9,000′ was reported as past peak the day Anthony headed up to the Hilton Lakes.

Hilton Lakes – Past Peak YOU MISSED IT!

Barney Lake (10/9/16) Leor Pantilat

Robinson Creek Trail to Barney Lake (10/9/16) Leor Pantilat

Barney Lake (10/9/16) Leor Pantilat

Robinson Creek Trail(10/9/16) Leor Pantilat

 

Barney Lake (10/9/16) Leor Pantilat

Robinson Creek Trail (10/9/16) Leor Pantilat

Barney Lake (10/9/16) Leor Pantilat

Robinson Creek Trail (10/9/16) Leor Pantilat

Leor Pantilat traveled to Mono County yesterday to capture these images on an iPhone.

He reports that the “Robinson Creek Trail to Barney Lake is at peak and dazzling with mountainsides full of yellow, orange and red contrasting with the rugged peaks surrounding the scene.

“After the short stretch in the pine forest near Twin Lakes, the trail emerges into meadows and the aspen at peak color is virtually unabated for 4 miles all the way to Barney Lake and beyond.

“I was at the same spot at the same time last year and the aspen show is substantially better this year with much less brown rot.

“Leaves were flying off the trees with every breeze so this is definitely a GO NOW! situation.”

He continues, “Strong winds are forecast as early as Thursday will likely end the show.”

Robinson Creek Trail to Barney Lake, Mono County – Peak (75-100%) GO NOW! 

June Lake Loop (10/9/16) Julie Kirby

June Lake Loop (10/9/16) Julie Kirby

June Lake should peak this weekend, with color lasting another week.  So, even if the winds strip some trees, enough color should remain along the June Lake Loop to keep it beautiful.

June Lake Loop – Near Peak (50-75%) GO NOW!

Sonora Pass (10/7/16) Dave Olden

Sonora Pass (10/7/16) Dave Olden

Sonora Pass and Leavitt Meadow are now wearing orange as if they were rooting for the San Francisco Giants in the playoffs.  When Dave Olden crossed the pass on Oct. 7, it was just beginning its peak.

Sonora Pass (10/10/16) Leor Pantilat

Sonora Pass (10/9/16) Leor Pantilat

Then, Leor Pantilat happened by on Sunday and found it had donned Giant colors. That’s how fast it peaks. Again, this color might not last out the week.

Sonora Pass – Peak (75-100%) GO NOW! 

CENTRAL COAST

Fremont cottonwood, Rose Valley Road, Ojai (10/6/16) Kevin Rose

Fremont cottonwood, Rose Valley Road, Ojai (10/6/16) Kevin Rose

First Report: Traveling north from Ojai along SR33, color spotter Kevin Rose found a stand of Fremont cottonwood, brushed by refreshing mountain breezes off Rose Valley Road.

The trees were showing patchy color at coordinates 34.5595382 – 119.1654414 along Sespe Creek.

Nearby, several backpackers were gearing up to hike Lion Canyon. Kevin did some of the same hike and declares it hike-worthy!  Turn right off CA-33 on Rose Valley Rd. and follow the parking lot to its bitter end.

This is a nice walk for Central Coast color spotters and earns title as HIKE OF THE WEEK. “Totally worth it!” wrote Rose who followed Rose Valley Road.

Rose Valley Road, Los Padres National Forest, Ojai – Patchy (10-50%)

Poison Oak, Humboldt Redwoods State Park (10/10/16) Max Forster

Poison Oak, Humboldt Redwoods State Park (10/10/16) Max Forster

NORTH COAST

Prairie Creek RSP (10/10/16) Max Forster

Prairie Creek RSP (10/10/16) Max Forster

Lost Man Creek, Redwood National Park (10/10/16) Max Forster

Lost Man Creek, Redwood National Park (10/10/16) Max Forster

Jedediah Smith RSP (10/10/16) Max Forster

Jedediah Smith RSP (10/10/16) Max Forster

North Coast color spotter Max Forster happened upon the historically significant Luna tree while looking for color in Humboldt Redwoods State Park.

This is the tree that Julia “Butterfly” Hill sat in for two years in protest of logging within the area.  

Humboldt Redwoods State Park – Patchy (10-50%).  Bigleaf maple and poison oak along the Avenue of the Giants have another week until peak yellow and crimson, though examples can be seen when rays of sun light the redwood forest. Look for the poison oak creeping up the trunks of the skyscraper redwoods along Mattole Road.

Redwood National & State Parks – (75%-100%) GO NOW!.  Most of the bigleaf maple are putting on their best show of the season.  Trees along Mill Creek (Jedediah Smith State Park) and Little Lost Man Creek (Redwood National Park) have turned particularly impressive over the last few days.

 

 

 

 

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Autumn Wildlife Festivals

Tundra Swans, California Swan Festival, Marysville (11/13) Leslie Morris

Tundra Swans, California Swan Festival, Marysville (11/13) Leslie Morris

Woodbridge Ecological Reserve (10/22/13) John Poimiroo

Sandhill Crane Festival, Woodbridge Ecological Reserve, Lodi (10/22/13) John Poimiroo

Autumn is a season of migration throughout California. Avian and insect species transit the state in multitudes, to our collective delight.

Several communities celebrate these migrations.

Here’s a list of some of California’s best autumn wildlife festivals.

 

 

CLICK HERE for more about Watchable Wildlife in California.

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Fall Color Podcast Reveals New Spots

Eileen Javora and Mark Finan (9/15/16) Live Facebook Podcast Screen Capture

Eileen Javora and Mark Finan (9/15/16) Live Facebook Podcast Screen Capture

Meteorologists Eileen Javora and Mark Finan of KCRA-TV3 (NBC) invited me to join them on a live Facebook podcast last evening.

We discussed fall color and where to find it, revealing a couple of (new to me) places to explore (late October) in the Sacramento area: Empire Mine and pistachio orchards. Road trip!

CLICK HERE to hear and see the discussion.

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Postcard: Peak, Peak, Peak, Peak, Peak

Apple Hill (11/19/15) Vera Haranto Fuad

Apple Hill (11/19/15) Vera Haranto Fuad

With with the possible exceptions of The Deserts and Santa Catalina Island, it is now peaking at all California elevations below 2,000′.

Apple Hill (11/16/15) Sarah Showalter

Apple Hill (11/16/15) Sarah Showalter

Apple Hill in the Sierra foothills of El Dorado County are canopied with color, as spotters Vera Haranto Fuad and Sarah Showalter found when they visited this past week.

Historic photos taken by Linnea Wahamaki and Susan Taylor (posted to our Facebook site) show the beauty seen this month in Nevada City in the Gold Country and at McArthur-Burney Falls State Park in the Shasta Cascade.

Seen from 800′ in the Sierra foothills at El Dorado Hills, the Sacramento Valley is covered with broad spotches of red, orange and yellow fall color, like a Persian carpet that’s been cast across the valley floor.

Maple, Nevada City (11/5/15) Linnea Wahamaki

Maple, Nevada City (11/5/15) Linnea Wahamaki

Maple, Nevada City (11/5/15) Linnea Wahamaki

Maple, Nevada City (11/5/15) Linnea Wahamaki

McArthur-Burney Falls (11/14/15) Susan Taylor

McArthur-Burney Falls (11/14/15) Susan Taylor

Red oak, Citrus Heights (11/16/15) Sarah Showalter

Red oak, Citrus Heights (11/16/15) Sarah Showalter

Ginkgo biloba, Agoura (11/19/15) Kathy Jonokuchi

Ginkgo biloba, Agoura (11/19/15) Kathy Jonokuchi

Blue oak, El Dorado Hills (11/21/15) John Poimiroo

Blue oak, El Dorado Hills (11/21/15) John Poimiroo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Showalter’s photo of a red oak ablaze in Citrus Heights is typical of the color to be seen lined along boulevards in Folsom, Fair Oaks, Carmichael and Sacramento.

Japanese maple, Ironstone Vineyards, Murphys (11/22/15) Bonnie Nordby

Japanese maple, Ironstone Vineyards, Murphys (11/22/15) Bonnie Nordby

Today, Bonnie Nordby strolled through a magical forest of crimson, yellow, orange and golden Japanese maple at the Ironstone Vineyards in Murphys, and sent us this snap.

From the Santa Clara Valley (Silicon), Jennifer “JMel” Mellone contributed photos taken in Campbell

Wherever you go, California’s many urban forests are on fire. Color spotter Kathy Jonokuchi sent snaps of garden color in Agoura and Nancy Wright of Murietta send added some of Pepper trees in Murietta (both in Southern California), where exotic trees will continue to provide fall color (weather permitting) through the Thanksgiving Day weekend.

However, from Plumas County, color spotter Jeff Luke Titcomb is almost longing in expressing that the fall color there has descended to the river bottoms. His brooding image of smoke rising through a forest of pine and black oak whose last remaining leaves cling weakly to spindly branches, is a nostalgic reminder that 2015’s autumn show has only days remaining.

Liquidambar, Campbell (11/22/15) Jennifer Malone

Liquidambar, Campbell (11/22/15) Jennifer Mellone

Ginkgo biloba, Campbell (11/22/15) Jennifer Malone

Ginkgo biloba, Campbell (11/22/15) Jennifer Mellone

Pepper, Campbell (11/22/15) Jennifer Malone

Pepper, Campbell (11/22/15) Jennifer Mellone

Pepper, Murietta (11/22/15) Nancy Wright

Pepper, Murietta (11/22/15) Nancy Wright

Pepper, Murietta (11/22/15) Nancy Wright

Pepper, Murietta (11/22/15) Nancy Wright

Black oak, Plumas County (11/22/15) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Black oak, Plumas County (11/22/15) Jeff Luke Titcomb

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Fall Color for the Holidays

Elm, Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Elm, Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Folks heading home for the holidays should see lots of fall color in yards and urban forests, as this sampling taken by color spotters across California attests.

Ginkgo biloba, Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Ginkgo biloba, Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Maple, Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Maple, Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

Southside Park, Sacramento (11/15/15) Jim Adams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jim Adams went out this week to capture glorious golden ginkgos and colossal claret-colored liquidambar along the boulevards of Sacramento’s Southside Park. Our state’s capital is a sight to behold in autumn when towering London Plane, Elm, Sycamore and trees of every imaginable variety, planted decades ago to shade the city from scorching summer heat, turn red-hot as Thanksgiving Day approaches.

Los Gatos (11/15/15) Anson Davalos

Los Gatos (11/15/15) Anson Davalos

Los Gatos (11/15/15) Anson Davalos

Los Gatos (11/15/15) Anson Davalos

Los Gatos (11/15/15) Anson Davalos

Los Gatos (11/15/15) Anson Davalos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the Santa Clara Valley (AKA Silicon),  Anson Davalos found Los Gatos streets  arched with rufous arbors.

Heavenly bamboo, Murietta (11/15/15) Nancy Wright

Heavenly bamboo, Murietta (11/15/15) Nancy Wright

Liquidambar, Murietta (11/15/15) Nancy Wright

Liquidambar, Murietta (11/15/15) Nancy Wright

Murietta (11/15/15) Nancy Wright

Murietta (11/15/15) Nancy Wright

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And, near Riverside, Nancy Wright drove through Murietta to find heavenly bamboo and liquidambar brightening the southland.

What makes California fall color so different from other areas on the continent is that our Mediterranean climate allows many varieties of exotic deciduous trees to flourish. That doesn’t happen elsewhere in North America.  And, that means we get a flush of brilliant color in our gardens, arboretums and urban forests that is incomparable.

Peak (75-100%) GO NOW! – California’s Urban Forests

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Central Valley – Just Starting

Fabulous 40s, Sacramento (10/16/15) John Poimiroo

Fabulous 40s, Sacramento (10/16/15) John Poimiroo

We’re beginning to see cottonwood topped with crests of gold within Central Valley wetland areas.  Soon, these wetlands and surrounding farmed rice fields will become banquet tables for wild geese, ducks and swans.

Walnut orchards west of Davis along I-80, near corn mazes, farm stands and pumpkin patches, are starting to show color.  Drive north on Hwys 70 and 99 to Oroville and Chico to pass more orchards full of walnut trees in two weeks to see them peak.

Fabulous 40s, Sacramento (10/16/15) John Poimiroo

Fabulous 40s, Sacramento (10/16/15) John Poimiroo

The urban forests of the Central Valley (Sacramento, Stockton, Modesto and Fresno) are just starting to show their color.  Towering London Plane trees arch over Sacramento’s Fabulous Forties (avenues numbered 40 – 49) in mid-town, the sun lighting their leaves to chartreuse brilliance.

In the next two to three weeks, browned leaves will fall and the sound of rakes and leaf blowers will reveal where they are being gathered into piles.  Today is the first day that Sacramento residents may leave the piles in the street to be picked up by the City.

There are so many trees in Sacramento and such a big drop of leaves, that the service continues into January. What a wonder it must be to be a kid in Sacramento with so many piles of leaves through which to ride your bike.

CSU Sacramento (10/16/15) John Poimiroo

CSU Sacramento (10/16/15) John Poimiroo

Sycamore, American River, Rancho Cordova (10/16/15) John Poimiroo

Sycamore, American River, Rancho Cordova (10/16/15) John Poimiroo

Other good places to watch leaves drop in Sacramento are: the Cal State Sacramento campus, Land Park and Discovery Park at the confluence of the American and Sacramento Rivers.

Just Starting (0-10%) – Central Valley