Posts

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One Fine Day

Courthouse Park, Quincy (10/21/18) Michael Beatley

Courthouse Park, Quincy (10/21/18) Michael Beatley

Plumas County Veterans Memorial, Courthouse Park, Quincy (10/21/18) Michael Beatley

Plumas County Superior Court, Quincy (10/21/18) Michael Beatley

Yesterday was one fine day in Quincy.

I got there about noon, and it was beautiful. I could see, however, that it would get better later that day. Regretably, I had a schedule to keep that didn’t involve lingering to see it.

Michael Beatley didn’t have the same restriction and got there in the late afternoon, to capture Quincy at its best.

Plumas County’s fall color is everywhere you drive, right now. It rolls over ridges and down hillsides in avalanches of muted orange, auburn and yellow.

Along highways that wind through Plumas National Forest, sparkling splashes of lemony yellow and deep gold appear at every turn.

Black oak are an emerging blend of evolving green, yellow and orange leaves.

Country villages like Greenville virtually glow from towering, iridescent-yellow Fremont cottonwood and pop with spots of hot red.

As for Quincy, I was lucky to be there on one fine day (my photos will appear in a separate post).

Sky-scraping crimson, orange, electric yellow and lime foliage crowned the town’s skyline on approach. Once in Quincy, the color was everywhere. Though, the Thieler Tree, Quincy’s famous sugar maple, had just passed Peak. Its red and orange leaves had curled and were sprinkled like confetti at the corner of Lee Way and West High St.

Peak color will continue to be seen through this week, but will weaken slowly throughout town as more leaves fall.

Plumas County, on the other hand, has two more weeks of peak, conditions permitting. 

  • Quincy – Peak (75-100%) GO NOW!
  • Plumas County – Peak (75-100%) GO NOW!

Quincy (10/21/18) Michael Beatley

Quincy (10/21/18) John Poimiroo

Plumas County Superior Court, Quincy (10/21/18) John Poimiroo

Courthouse Park, Quincy (10/21/18) John Poimiroo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quincy (10/21/18) John Poimiroo

Plumas County Superior Court, Quincy (10/21/18) John Poimiroo

Courthouse Park, Quincy (10/21/18) John Poimiroo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courthouse Park, Quincy (10/21/18) Michael Beatley

Quincy (10/21/18) Michael Beatley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quincy (10/21/18) John Poimiroo

Feather River Hot Springs (10/21/18) John Poimiroo

Plumas County Superior Court Annex, Quincy (10/21/18) John Poimiroo

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Ordered To Appear

Sugar maple, Thompson Ranch, LaPorte Rd., Quincy (10/14/18) Michael Beatley

The Thieler Tree, Quincy (10/14/18) Michael Beatley

You are hereby ordered to appear at the Plumas County Courthouse in Quincy to attest that trees surrounding the court are Near Peak.

Now that you have been duly served, what can you expect to see?

Towering maple, plane trees and elm, anytime from now through this weekend and the following week, depending on conditions. The trees will be glorious, carrying heavy loads of orange, red and lime.

Local color spotters Michael Beatley and Jeff Luke Titcomb report that Quincy’s most photographed maple, The Theiler Tree at the former residence of Judge Alan Theiler, is red-hot and not-to-be-missed. It’s on West High Street and Lee Way, behind the courthouse.

Other great spots to photograph in and surrounding Quincy, include Community United Methodist Church at 282 Jackson St. This white steepled church is backed by black oak, when at peak (it’s still early) are deep orange (seen below in the UpStateCA graphic).

Plumas County Courthouse, Quincy (10/14/18) Michael Beatley

Plumas County Courthouse, Quincy (10/14/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Spanish Creek at Oakland Camp (10/14/18) Michael Beatley

Thompson Lake, near Bucks Lake, Plumas County (10/15/18) Michael Beatley

Along LaPorte Rd. look for Thompson Ranch and its landmark sugar maple, which is now peaking. In fact all the sugar maples in town are a rich orange-cream color.

The Indian rhubarb at Spanish Creek in Oakland camp are now peaking at 3,500′, so get there quick to see their bright red-orange umbrella-shaped leaves reflected in the creek’s still waters.

More reflections of aspen are seen at Thompson Lake west of Quincy near Buck’s Lake.

Jeff Luke Titcomb said most of Plumas County’s fall color backroads can be driven in a normal passenger vehicle. To prove it, he sent a photo of his classic Cadillac DeVille that he drove on a spotting trip to Round Valley.

He described, “The road away from Almanor is gravel and well maintained. Some days, though, you’ll be sharing it with logging trucks. The color down in the ravines is full of dogwoods and the springs are running pretty strong with lots of yellow maples, the oaks are coming on too, now. You will need to stop and explore the canyon’s full of color, which is getting very strong now.”

Be sure to appear by your appointed court date and time (not to late in the day), or you could miss Peak color in and around Quincy. 

  • Quincy (3,432′) – Near Peak (50-75%) GO NOW!

 

Dogwood, Plumas County (10/13/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Bigleaf maple, Plumas County (10/13/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Bigleaf maple and willow, Plumas County (10/13/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Plumas County Courthouse  (10/14/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Quincy, Plumas County (10/14/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Quincy, Plumas County (10/14/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Sugar maple, Quincy, Plumas County (10/14/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Sugar maple, Quincy, Plumas County (10/14/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Sugar maple, Plumas County (10/13/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Black oak, Plumas County (10/13/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Plumas County Courthouse  (10/14/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb

Quincy, Plumas County (10/14/18) Jeff Luke Titcomb